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People suffering from mesothelioma usually go through a lot of difficulties. Mesothelioma is a type of cancer that occurs after asbestos exposure. For starters, mesothelioma treatment can be costly. Victims of mesothelioma and their loved ones usually spend a lot of money from the time of diagnosis through post-treatment care. Some spend thousands of dollars, and, others, even more. The amount of money a victim of mesothelioma spends generally depends on their treatment plan, health care provider, and other factors.

Secondly, mesothelioma often causes pain, which is usually one of the early signs of mesothelioma. As fluids build up and tumors grow, it usually becomes difficult for a victim to digest food, breathe, and even cough without experiencing pain. Additionally, fluid buildup, which leads to increased pressure, can also cause pain in a victim’s abdomen or chest.

Severe pain can interfere with the day-to-day life of a mesothelioma patient. For instance, pain can prevent a patient from working or participating in other everyday activities, leading to feelings of loneliness and isolation. The day-to-day lives of families of patients also suffer when pain is involved.

Even though mesothelioma and lung cancer are both deadly cancers, they are different diseases. Mesothelioma is a type of cancer that develops in the lining around the lungs and chest when a person inhales asbestos fibers. Asbestos, which is the only known cause of cancerous mesothelioma, is a naturally occurring mineral. The mineral was used as a building material before people became aware of its hazardous properties. Asbestos leads to mesothelioma because it causes changes at a cellular level. This toxic substance triggers inflammation, scarring, and damage that can cause cancer. Usually, when asbestos is disturbed, it releases tiny fibers into the air. When these fibers are inhaled, they get stuck in the pleural lining of the lungs and chest. Asbestos exposure is most prevalent in industrial workplaces.

On the other hand, lung cancer develops in the lungs and not in the lining of the lungs. Unlike mesothelioma, which has one known cause (asbestos), lung cancer has many known causes. Nonetheless, even though lung cancer often occurs because of other factors, the reality is that asbestos exposure can also cause lung cancer. When asbestos fibers get stuck in a person’s lungs, they can develop lung cancer.

After symptoms that suggest a serious lung problem start emerging, an individual might think they have lung cancer, when in fact they have mesothelioma, or vice versa, because both diseases can present a similar set of symptoms. Nonetheless, a history of being exposed to asbestos fibers is what physicians look for when trying to identify mesothelioma specifically. Some of the symptoms people with mesothelioma or lung cancer experience include;

In a recently decided Ohio mesothelioma lawsuit, a jury awarded the estate of an 83-year-old Korean War Veteran $12.1 million in compensatory and punitive damages. The jury awarded the veteran’s estate this amount after hearing and deliberating on the details of the veteran’s decades-long asbestos exposure and his ensuing diagnosis and death from malignant mesothelioma. At first, the jury had awarded the plaintiff compensatory damages amounting to $6.1 million. The judge then decided to add another $6 million in punitive damages against John Crane, Inc.

The war veteran worked in the stockroom at the Pfaudler Co. plant in Elyria, Ohio, for more than four decades. He started working at the Pfaudler Co. plant after his service in Korea. While working at Pfaudler, the veteran was responsible for preparing shipments of specialized glass-coated steel bowls used in chemical and pharmaceuticals manufacturing. Every week, he would spend hours cutting asbestos-contaminated rope using a band saw. Because the material was asbestos-contaminated, cutting it with a band saw led to the spread of asbestos particles into the air, which he then inhaled.

According to reports, the veteran was a hard-working man who always did what he was told to do at work. Unfortunately, neither he nor his fellow employees were ever informed of the hazards of the product they were handling because Pfaudler was in the dark. Pfaudler was never warned about the asbestos-contaminated rope, and the evidence presented at trial proved this fact. Crane Packing Co., now formally known as John Crane Inc., the material’s manufacturer, knew that the material had a high concentration of blue crocidolite asbestos, but never warned Pfaudler of the material’s potential danger or advised the plant on proper handling. The material’s manufacturer always advertised the material as ‘completely non-toxic.’ However, once Pfaudler realized that the material was toxic – an entire three years before John Crane issued any form of public warning – the company stopped using it. Unfortunately, by then, it was late for the war veteran, as he had already been exposed to asbestos for many years.

Construction workers are prone to several dangers. In fact, the construction sector is considered among the most dangerous sectors in which to work. Unfortunately, people have become so accustomed to the dangers that construction workers face daily that occupational hazards in the construction sector have become acceptable risks. Construction workers are, for instance, prone to slip and falls, which is the main leading cause of traumatic brain injuries. Apart from being prone to slip and falls, construction workers also risk being exposed to harmful substances. One of the harmful substances that construction workers risk being exposed to is asbestos.

Asbestos, a dangerous substance that causes mesothelioma and other life-altering diseases, continues to threaten the health and lives of many construction workers. Even though current laws limit the use of asbestos, construction workers are still prone to occupational exposure. Asbestos exposure remains a significant problem in the construction industry and might pose an even greater risk for years to come. Considering asbestos was commonly used in the construction industry, construction workers today come across this substance regularly. When construction workers come into contact with asbestos-containing materials, they can develop illnesses such as mesothelioma that can alter their lives and those of their families forever.

Asbestos can remain hidden in almost every part of a building or structure. Therefore, just because a person does not construct new buildings or structures, does not mean they are safe from exposure to asbestos. Workers conducting maintenance, renovations, or demolitions are all at risk of asbestos exposure in the same way those who interact with asbestos during the construction of new buildings or structures are.

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