Articles Posted in Asbestos Containing Materials

Asbestos is a substance that can cause several life-threatening diseases, such as mesothelioma, asbestosis, and lung cancer. This dangerous mineral is no longer used as frequently as it was many years ago because of strict regulations. Unfortunately, even though asbestos is no longer being used as it was before the 1980s, there is a significant risk of people being exposed to legacy asbestos.

What is Legacy Asbestos?

Legacy asbestos was put in place before governments started regulating the use of asbestos, but it still presents a hazard. The passing of time and forgetting of asbestos that was put in place many years ago is what causes asbestos to become legacy asbestos. Unfortunately, most people do not know that legacy asbestos exists, and that is what makes legacy asbestos so dangerous.

For purposes of this article, the defendant, in this case, will be referred to as A.O.H.

Veterans are at a high risk of developing asbestos-related illnesses like mesothelioma. This is especially true for people who served in the military between 1935 and 1975. According to research, it was at this period that asbestos use in the military was at its highest. The military favored using asbestos-contaminated products because this material is fire-resistant and highly durable. In particular, navy vessels, such as submarines, had many asbestos products. As a result, thousands of veterans who worked on navy vessels have developed asbestos-related diseases like mesothelioma. Mr. A.O.H is just one example of the many U.S. veterans who have developed mesothelioma after exposure to asbestos while serving in the U.S. Navy aboard nuclear submarines.

Mr. A.O.H. was diagnosed with mesothelioma three years ago. After his diagnosis, he and his spouse filed a lawsuit against Armstrong Pumps. Mr. H blames Armstrong Pumps for his asbestos exposure while he was part of the U.S. Navy aboard nuclear submarines. Specifically, A.O.H. blames his mesothelioma on the Armstrong pumps he worked with. The pumps were located close to where Mr. H used to work, and his work included supervising the maintenance of the pumps.

The disposal of asbestos must be tackled in a specific manner. Improper disposal of asbestos can put people at risk of suffering asbestos exposure, thus developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma.  Even if the fibers are outdoors, they can be kicked up high enough for someone to inhale them. Because of how dangerous improper asbestos disposal can be, it is crucial for anyone removing asbestos to involve a professional.  Asbestos abatement professionals are highly trained to follow the correct procedures. On top of putting the lives of others at risk, anyone who disposes of asbestos improperly faces serious fines or penalties if they break one of the laws regulating asbestos removal and disposal. Asbestos abatement professionals are highly trained to follow the laid down rules.

Homeowners and Asbestos Abatement and Disposal

Sometimes landowners decide to remove and dispose of asbestos on their own. However, this is risky. If a property owner believes they have asbestos on their property, certain steps must be taken to ensure the dangerous mineral is removed and disposed of in a safe manner. If a landowner decides to handle the removal and disposal of asbestos on their own, they put a lot of people in danger. They also risk facing fines and penalties if they break one of the laws regulating asbestos removal and disposal.

Asbestos was once widely used in the United States of America. This material is not yet banned in the U.S., but its use has drastically reduced over the years. When asbestos is contained, it is generally not harmful. On the other hand, if asbestos is damaged or disturbed, it can pose serious health risks. If asbestos is disturbed, asbestos fibers can become airborne. When asbestos fibers become airborne, people can inhale them and develop serious health conditions.

Who is Most Likely to Get Exposed to Asbestos?

Long ago, asbestos was widely used in several industries across the United States. The people who worked in industries that frequently used asbestos were at the greatest risk of being directly exposed to asbestos. If, for example, a person worked as a shipyard worker, construction worker, demolition worker, carpenter, or painter, they might have been at a greater risk of being directly exposed to asbestos. Even today, people working in certain industries are at great risk of being directly exposed to asbestos.

The Supreme Court of the State of New York recently denied a petition from Ford Motor Company asking the Court to shut down mesothelioma lawsuit against them.  When the defendant in this case, who for purposes of this article will be referred to as J.S., discovered he had mesothelioma, he and his spouse filed a lawsuit against Ford Motor Company. According to the lawsuit, the company is responsible for J.S.’s exposure to asbestos-containing parts during his years at a dealership in Orchard Park. What is interesting about this case is that Ford did not deny that the parts J.S. was dealing with were asbestos-contaminated. The company also didn’t deny the fact that asbestos is a toxin.

After J.S. discovered he had mesothelioma at age 65, he filed a lawsuit against Ford Motor Company, the company responsible for his asbestos exposure, thus, his illness. According to J.S.’s lawsuit, he worked as a delivery man for the dealership in Orchard Park. During his time in this position, J.S. was exposed to asbestos-containing dust when he unlocked boxes and dealt with brakes and clutches from Ford. In his claim, J.S. also stated that he had maintenance, cleaning, and sweeping duties during his time at the dealership. On top of that, J.S. stated in his lawsuit that he suffered asbestos exposure through his interaction with mechanics performing clutch and brake jobs.

The defendant did not deny that J.S.’s work involved dealing with asbestos-contaminated products. The company did not deny that asbestos is dangerous and can cause illnesses. Ford’s argument was focused on whether J.S.’s closeness to their parts was enough to result in him developing his illness. The company’s argument centered on whether chrysotile asbestos caused risk compared to amphibole asbestos. Also, Ford Motors argued that therapeutic radiation could have caused J.S.’s illness.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, asbestos is a mineral fiber that occurs in soil and rocks. Asbestos was widely used before the 1980s in, among other things, building materials. It was in the 1980s that the dangerous effects of this mineral became widely known. However, although asbestos is not commonly used today, it is still used in some products. Also, asbestos can be found in old buildings. This means that asbestos exposure remains a problem. Asbestos can cause various deadly diseases, such as mesothelioma, asbestosis, and lung cancer.

The following are four steps that should be taken after someone gets exposed to asbestos or if someone has a history of asbestos exposure.

Consult a Doctor Early

Asbestos is a group of minerals that occur naturally in soil and rock. It is made up of heat-resistant fibers. Apart from being resistant to heat, asbestos is also resistant to rot and rust. Because of its properties, asbestos is considered a very versatile product. However, as much as asbestos might sound harmless, the truth is that asbestos exposure can lead to the development of aggressive and deadly diseases like mesothelioma. Being exposed to asbestos once is enough to lead to the development of an illness.

Unfortunately, there is still no widespread ban on asbestos in the United States of America. In the U.S., asbestos continues to be used in different products. And even if a ban is put in place, many industries used asbestos in the past for various purposes. It is still possible for asbestos-contaminated products to exist even with an asbestos ban in place.

Asbestos can be found in many places. This dangerous mineral can also be found in places one would not expect. Below is a look at some common and uncommon places where you could find asbestos.

Asbestos exposure can cause deadly diseases such as mesothelioma. Unfortunately, if you work with asbestos or asbestos-contaminated materials, you are at an increased risk of asbestos exposure. In fact, occupational asbestos exposure is among the most common types of exposure.

If you work with asbestos or asbestos-contaminated materials, OSHA requires your employer to take certain steps to reduce the hazards of asbestos at work. Indeed, the exact steps your employer must take depend on the industry. However, there are some basic requirements that all employers are required to meet.

What are the Hazards of Asbestos?

After two weeks of in-person trial, a Los Angeles County jury awarded a 64-year-old woman diagnosed with mesothelioma $43 million on May 20, 2022. This verdict is among the largest seen in recent years. The woman, who was diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2019, blamed Algoma Hardwoods Inc. for her condition.

According to the evidence presented, the 64-year-old California woman never directly worked with the toxic substance known as asbestos. However, her husband used to work in a capacity that exposed him to asbestos. He worked with doors that contained asbestos. The asbestos dust from the doors got stuck in his skin, hair, and clothes, and he brought this dust home. Even though the woman sometimes assisted her husband on-site, most of the asbestos exposure she suffered was from the asbestos dust her husband brought home. According to a family representative, the 64-year-old woman suffered asbestos exposure while doing her husband’s laundry. Also, just being inside the home exposed her to asbestos.

From 1977 to 1980, Algoma made fire-resistant asbestos-contaminated doors. The jury found the company 50% liable for the 64-year-old woman’s mesothelioma. The jury then assessed comparative fault against other defendants. The following is a breakdown of the percentage of responsibility each defendant was awarded;

Asbestos is a mineral that causes mesothelioma, a rare and deadly type of cancer. In fact, asbestos is the only known cause of mesothelioma. In an attempt to reduce mesothelioma cases, many countries worldwide have banned asbestos. However, asbestos has not been banned in the United States of America.

Do asbestos bans really help? Does banning asbestos reduce the incidence of mesothelioma? A recent study shows that asbestos bans can reduce mesothelioma cases, although not immediately. The findings of this study might affect asbestos rules in America.

Data From Study Indicates Asbestos Bans Can Reduce Mesothelioma Cases

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